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thrandisse:

I need his armRb S6

thrandisse:

I need his arm
Rb S6

(via the42towels)

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themysticinnkeeper:

chaoskiwi:

zitoisneato:

becausebirds:

Kiwi on a treadmill.

LOOKIT HIM WADDLE!

i must become fit

go kiwi go!

themysticinnkeeper:

chaoskiwi:

zitoisneato:

becausebirds:

Kiwi on a treadmill.

LOOKIT HIM WADDLE!

i must become fit

go kiwi go!

Text

mazeltoph:

how can we believe the dates written on historical documents when the other day i wrote january 2010 on one of my papers

(via viverobespierre)

Chat
  • Me: *sees skeleton decorations in store*
  • Me: *breathes*
  • Mom: no
Tags: I feel this
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afternoobs:

thegreendeceiver:

myheartbeatsuppeople:

the ol’ razzzle dazzle

No but actually this is a GREAT way to present a dress like this! A regular standing mannequin wouldn’t show off all the layers and details in the skirt!

it also wouldn’t show off all the ol’ razzle dazzle

afternoobs:

thegreendeceiver:

myheartbeatsuppeople:

the ol’ razzzle dazzle

No but actually this is a GREAT way to present a dress like this! A regular standing mannequin wouldn’t show off all the layers and details in the skirt!

it also wouldn’t show off all the ol’ razzle dazzle

(Source: weheartit.com, via the-fisher-queen)

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tenshiko:


sushiandpie:

taco-bell-rey:



EXCEPT THIS ISNT JUST A FUNNY HAHA SILLY HEADLINE GUYS
this is really important and is a really great program that teaches skills to inmates and allows them to basically receive group therapy while they are simultaneously learning a craft
IT IS ALSO REALLY RADICAL BECAUSE IT BREAKS NOT ONLY THE STEREOTYPE THAT INMATES ARE INCAPABLE OF BEING DECENT HUMAN BEINGS WHO CAN TALK OUT THEIR ISSUES AND HEAL AND BE FUNCTIONING MEMBERS OF SOCIETY BUT IT ALSO SHOWS THAT TRADITIONALLY GENDERED HOBBIES LIKE KNITTING ARENT JUST “FOR WOMEN” AND ARE ENJOYABLE FOR EVERYONE.
here is an from the above article

They started by knitting comfort dolls, which they gave to children removed from their homes because of domestic issues. Then they moved on to hats for kids at the inner-city elementary school many of the prisoners attended, Zwerling says. “If you look at them, they’re covered with tattoos, they’re rough looking, and many of the young guys don’t have all their teeth,” she says. “But it doesn’t feel rough. They’re very respectful and grateful and very happy to knit.”

THEY KNIT COMFORT ITEMS FOR ABUSED KIDS. THEY KNIT HATS FOR INNER-CITY CHILDREN.
this is a good program and i really hope that people actually look into it rather than just posting the headline and a silly image attached ok
original article - x

Seriously go read that article. 

tenshiko:

sushiandpie:

taco-bell-rey:

EXCEPT THIS ISNT JUST A FUNNY HAHA SILLY HEADLINE GUYS

this is really important and is a really great program that teaches skills to inmates and allows them to basically receive group therapy while they are simultaneously learning a craft

IT IS ALSO REALLY RADICAL BECAUSE IT BREAKS NOT ONLY THE STEREOTYPE THAT INMATES ARE INCAPABLE OF BEING DECENT HUMAN BEINGS WHO CAN TALK OUT THEIR ISSUES AND HEAL AND BE FUNCTIONING MEMBERS OF SOCIETY BUT IT ALSO SHOWS THAT TRADITIONALLY GENDERED HOBBIES LIKE KNITTING ARENT JUST “FOR WOMEN” AND ARE ENJOYABLE FOR EVERYONE.

here is an from the above article

They started by knitting comfort dolls, which they gave to children removed from their homes because of domestic issues. Then they moved on to hats for kids at the inner-city elementary school many of the prisoners attended, Zwerling says. “If you look at them, they’re covered with tattoos, they’re rough looking, and many of the young guys don’t have all their teeth,” she says. “But it doesn’t feel rough. They’re very respectful and grateful and very happy to knit.”

THEY KNIT COMFORT ITEMS FOR ABUSED KIDS. THEY KNIT HATS FOR INNER-CITY CHILDREN.

this is a good program and i really hope that people actually look into it rather than just posting the headline and a silly image attached ok

original article - x

Seriously go read that article. 

(Source: literarynerd, via the-fisher-queen)

Photoset

bemusedlybespectacled:

liamgalgey:

Mike Wazowski joins the Avengers.

THOR’S HAMMER IS BLOCKING HIS FACE I AM DYING

(via geothebio)

Photoset

Do the wrong thing for the right reason.

(Source: henstridgebabe, via geothebio)

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copperbadge:

iguessijustlikelikingthings:

[glasses cleaning intensifies]

That is very much the show I watched.
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mrhipp:

Fathers, be good to your daughters.

mrhipp:

Fathers, be good to your daughters.

(via the42towels)

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markruffalo:

aos-skimmons:

so I was thinking that mark ruffalo sounds a lot like mark buffalo, and then i decided that i obviously wasn’t going to be the only one who thought about this. so i typed ‘ruffalo the buffalo’ into google images and i found these…

image

image

image

i don’t know why but it made me happy 

I don’t know why but it makes me happy too.

(via the42towels)

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theoddmentemporium:

A mustache does not have to be a simple tuft of hair above the lip and below the nose. In the 19th century, mustaches assumed all kinds of forms thanks to the holding power of wax. They were personal works of art.
The wax, however, was not perfect. For one, it could be melted or mussed by steam or hot liquids. That spelled trouble at tea time. But never fear, the relentlessly inventive 19th century tinkerer devised a solution: the mustache protector.
Originally invented by English potter Harvey Adams in 1830, according to Allan Peterkin’s “One Thousand Beards: A Cultural History of Facial Hair,” mustache guards were so popular that many others were quick to claim their own patents.
While drinking, a man would rest his majestic mustache on the guard that stretched across the inside of the cup. The ledge would block hot drinks from melting his mustache out of shape.

theoddmentemporium:

A mustache does not have to be a simple tuft of hair above the lip and below the nose. In the 19th century, mustaches assumed all kinds of forms thanks to the holding power of wax. They were personal works of art.

The wax, however, was not perfect. For one, it could be melted or mussed by steam or hot liquids. That spelled trouble at tea time. But never fear, the relentlessly inventive 19th century tinkerer devised a solution: the mustache protector.

Originally invented by English potter Harvey Adams in 1830, according to Allan Peterkin’s “One Thousand Beards: A Cultural History of Facial Hair,” mustache guards were so popular that many others were quick to claim their own patents.

While drinking, a man would rest his majestic mustache on the guard that stretched across the inside of the cup. The ledge would block hot drinks from melting his mustache out of shape.

(via serazienne)

Tags: history